swamp

swamp
swamp swamp [swɒmp ǁ swɑːmp] verb [transitive]
1. to suddenly give someone a lot of work or things to deal with:

• The flood of orders swamped some understaffed trading desks.

swamp be swamped (with something)

• Brokers said they were swamped with calls after the announcement.

2. if goods or manufacturers swamp an economy, market etc, there are so many of them available that the price of goods becomes very low:

• Cheap imports still swamp U.S. sales in electronic appliances.

swamp something with something

• The moment they see a chance to make money, mining companies swamp the market with new shares.

* * *

swamp UK US /swɒmp/ verb [T]
to have too many of something, or give someone too much to do: »

Huge volumes of fake designer brands have swamped the EU market.

be swamped with sth »

After the severe storms, insurance companies are expecting to be swamped with claims.

be swamped by sth »

Consumers are feeling swamped by high levels of credit card debt.

»

We've all been swamped with work since the policy changes.

»

swamped with calls/emails/letters


Financial and business terms. 2012.

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Swamp — Swamp, n. [Cf. AS. swam a fungus, OD. swam a sponge, D. zwam a fungus, G. schwamm a sponge, Icel. sv[ o]ppr, Dan. & Sw. swamp, Goth. swamms, Gr. somfo s porous, spongy.] Wet, spongy land; soft, low ground saturated with water, but not usually… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swamp — [swämp, swômp] n. [< dial. var. (or LowG cognate) of ME sompe, akin to MLowG swamp, Goth & OE swamm, fungus, mushroom < IE base * swomb(h)os, spongy, porous > Gr somphos, spongy] a piece of wet, spongy land that is permanently or… …   English World dictionary

  • swamp — 1624 (first used by Capt. John Smith, in reference to Virginia), perhaps a dialectal survival from an O.E. cognate of O.N. svoppr sponge, fungus, from P.Gmc. *swampuz; but traditionally connected with M.E. sompe morass, swamp, probably from M.Du …   Etymology dictionary

  • swamp — swamp; swamp·ber·ry; swamp·er; swamp·i·ness; …   English syllables

  • swamp|y — «SWOM pee, SWM », adjective, swamp|i|er, swamp|i|est. 1. like a swamp; soft and wet: »swampy ground. The front yard is swampy from the heavy rain. SYNONYM(S): boggy, marshy …   Useful english dictionary

  • Swamp — Swamp, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Swamped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swamping}.] 1. To plunge or sink into a swamp. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To cause (a boat) to become filled with water; to capsize or sink by whelming with water. [1913 Webster] 3. Fig.: To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Swamp — Swamp, v. i. 1. To sink or stick in a swamp; figuratively, to become involved in insuperable difficulties. [1913 Webster] 2. To become filled with water, as a boat; to founder; to capsize or sink; figuratively, to be ruined; to be wrecked. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swamp — [n] wet land covered with vegetation bog, bottoms, everglade, fen, glade, holm, marsh, marshland, mire, moor, morass, mud, muskeg, peat bog, polder, quag, quagmire, slough, swale, swampland; concept 509 swamp [v] overwhelm, flood beset, besiege,… …   New thesaurus

  • swamp|er — «SWOM puhr, SWM », noun. U.S. 1. a person who lives in a swamp or swampy region: »Everybody thought we were just a state of hillbillies and swampers (Time). 2. a) a person who works clearing roads for lumberjacks or clearing fallen trees of limbs …   Useful english dictionary

  • swamp — index immerse (plunge into), inundate, overcome (overwhelm) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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